All posts filed under: Travel

Travel Stories: Panama – Part 6: Back to Panama City

We’re almost through, aren’t we? This feels so weird, honestly. Over the last few weeks I have been blogging weekly which feels very much like an achievment to me. Thank you to everyone who has been part of this journey with me! You mean a lot to me!Now: Without further ado: Here’s part 6: Back to Panama City! Let’s adress the elephant in the room: The Panamá Canal Apart from tax fraud this is probably the ONE thing most people associate Panama with. The Canal. In and of itself a wonder of modern – and not so modern engineeringNow: I’m not an engineer … I watch movies in class. So all of this wasn’t too exciting for me. I feel like I should disclose that. If you want to see the flood gates open and close you should most definetely check the schedule and be there early. While the bus drivers may not care about time and punctuality most captains do. If not: There’s more to do: There is a museum spanning over four or …

Travel Stories:Panama – Part 5: Portobelo

Are you ready for some pirate action? Because today we will (re)visit the small bayside town of Portobelo, Panamá. This place smells of history and sounds of clanking swords … yet there is not to much else to do there … How to get to Portobelo Here’s were hings get tricky (again). As I’ve talked about in my Santa Catalina – Post: Getting around Panama isn’t that easy, even if you do have a car. And with Portobelo ist was a little bit worse … There are some trips being sold yet … They’re rare and usually not under 100$. Which is a little ridicoulus … But more on that soon. We went on to ask the really nice guy at the El Machico reception and he had a solution: Take the bus. If you want to get to Portobelo you need to get to Albrook Bus Terminal and take the bus headed towards Colón. There’s an express one that will usually not stop inbetween or some more scenic options. Do not go all the …

Travel Stories: Panama – Part 4: San Blas Islands

Ok, where do I start?One very interesting thing about Panama is it’s georgraphical makeup: Panamá is a so called landbridge; it connects the landmasses between Costa Rica and Colombia and has two coasts with completely different characteristics. I’ve told you about one of those coasts already: Santa Catalina was a beach town located near the Pacific. Let’s hop over to the other side, shall we? San Blas Islands The San Blas Islands are a group of smaller and bigger carribean islands just off the Atlantic coast of Panama. Some of them do have people living on them, some don’t. The whole area of San Blas is a self-contained Guna Community and therefore only accessible for strangers and tourists through booking a tour. The tours start from Panamá City and will then transport you up to the coast where you will then enter the boat to get your to the island you will be staying at. El Machico Hostal The Hostel we’d stay at in Panamá City. It is very central and you can walk almost …

Travel Stories: Panama – Part 3: Boquete

Boquete was the third city on our list. Located in the part of beautiful Chiriquí at the ffot of mount Barú and Panamá’s coffee capital. So as we did before we intended to go by bus … That plan was quickly foiled given that there was no accurate description of the rout é to be found: You’d have to go back to Sona, then to Santiago, David and then: Boquete. The route might take you any time between 5 to 10 hours and supposedly costs you something between 15 to 25$. We just booked a shuttle. You can book those at any hostel and you should do so the day before. The shuttle will take you to Boquete for 30$ and about 5 hours. Easy. It is a bit expensive but most definetely more comfortable. I really liked just sitting in the car, looking out the window: First of all: The forest is beautiful. So serene and lush and green. Secondly: Taking part in local traffic is hilarious! As I mentioned before: I am German. …

Travel Stories: Panama – Part 2: Santa Catalina

Alright … I’m Back! Here with Travel Stories Panama – Part 2! Who else is excited? Today I am going to tell you about my time spent in Santa Catalina. I was, when I boarded the bus to Santa Catalina! We decided to take the local bus, since it’s the cheapest, easiest way around and I feel like it is always nice to mix with the locals. You’ll have the full travel experience, learn something on the way and might even make a friend or two. Neither off us was above the age of 25 so renting a car was out of the question. I found some offers that would rent out a car if you were 21 and had your license for at least a year but most were 25 or above or would have you pay extra for any younger driver. We’d also have to pay for gas. I am not sure about the laws about camping in Panama, so you could save on hostels but please check that first to avoid any …